November 2009

 

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T
he theme for our November edition is Scotland and Ireland. Velma Dinkley describes what is available on Family Tree Forum to help in both areas. 

 

Researching any ancestors can be tricky and time consuming, but Irish research can be particularly difficult. Janet writes about her research into her Irish relations, which began in 1990, along the way solving some puzzles and discovering some fascinating connections with Irish history. kathsgirl.48 describes her search, over five years, for the ancestors of her grandparents who lived in Dublin City. Macbev and wulliam write about Scots who travelled far afield, one settling in Australia and the other who spent his life at sea.

 

To mark Remembrance Sunday, we have two articles; one from Just Barbara who writes about tank crews and Simon in Bucks describes the ceremonies at the Cenotaph in November 2008. The featured location this time is the village of Imber on Salisbury Plain where jenoco's relations lived until they were moved out by the army in 1943.

 

In addition, borobabs tells the story of her day out to find the place where her husband's ancestor farmed in 1841, which was not without its difficulties. The family treasure is Grandma's Tea Set described by Yorkshire Lady.

 

 

How FTF can help you research Scottish and Irish ancestors


H
ave you discovered a Scottish or Irish ancestor, but have been unsuccessful in researching the family? Then look no further then Family Tree Forum where help is at hand to break down your genealogical brick walls! Firstly, take a look at 'The Wiki' - Family Tree Forum's Reference Library.


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Tracing My Irish Roots


I
started researching my ancestry five years ago and, after reading about how so many people found it difficult tracing theirs, I didn’t quite know how I was going to get on.

My Irish-born mum only ever had a baptism certificate, and had tried to get her birth certificate from Dublin before she could marry my dad in England in 1947.


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My Family and The Troubles


M
y auntie, Chrissie O’Neil, died in New York on Easter Sunday 2009, aged almost 101, and I'm writing this article as a tribute to her. She was the youngest of 10 children and the last one in her family to pass away. During her life she wrote to all the members of the family and we all wrote to her.


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Scots with Itchy Feet


I
n stark contrast to one of my families, who lived for generations in the same small village in Wiltshire, my husband’s Scottish paternal line seems to have been born with itchy feet. Peter McKinlay emerged from Callander in Perthshire trailing a very scanty family history behind him.


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Scottish Seafarer


N
orman Macleod was born, according to his birth certificate, at 12 noon on 12th November 1874 at Swordale on the Isle of Lewis, in North-West Scotland. Fluent only in his native tongue of Gaelic, he joined the Royal Navy in early 1891 and was sent to the shore base of 'HMS Impregnable' at Devonport for his training.


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Well that was a fight and a half!

M
y husband’s great great grandfather, Thomas Pickering, was a farmer at Keysbeck on the North Yorkshire Moors at the time of the 1841 census. He lived there with his wife Jane and his children John, Ann and William. William is my husband's direct ancestor. 10 years later, he was working as an agricultural labourer, living with his family at Newholm Cum Dunsley, near Whitby, on the North Yorkshire coast.

 


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Did Grandad Crew a Landship at Flers Courcellette?


F
lers Courcellette was an insignificant backwater in France and played a small part of the battles of the Somme, but what made it momentous was the unveiling of the British Army's secret weapon, the battle tank. General Haig, the British Commander-in-Chief, was desperate to end the war in the trenches, and perhaps overly enthusiastic about the potential of the first tanks, he insisted that they take part in the offensive at Flers.

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Remembrance


T
his coming Sunday (8th November) people will gather all over the world in ceremonies to remember those who have died in conflicts and hostilities.

The Queen, members of the Royal family, politicians and representatives of the armed services, as well as ex-soldiers and members of the public, will be attending the national ceremony at the Cenotaph in Whitehall, with a two-minute silence held at 11am.


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Featured location
Little Imber on the Downe


O
n November 1st, 1943, the inhabitants of the tiny village of Imber on Salisbury Plain were called to a meeting in the schoolroom and given 47 days notice to leave their village – they thought the meeting would be about the installation of piped water. On November 27th, 1943, the last wedding took place at St. Giles Church between Bernard Wright and Phyllis Daniels.


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Family Treasure
Grandma's Tea Set


I
have what remains of a tea service given to my paternal grandparents at their wedding in 1910. The china came to my parents on their marriage, as by then Grandma had died and Grandad wanted his son's wife to have it. I remember seeing this set in the china cabinet at my grandad's house, where we lived for a while, and later in our own family home.


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Copyright Notice Copyright Notice

T
he Celtic Graphics used on this page are from the Aon Celtic Art website.

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